Posts tagged "music"
GLORY BOUND
Six weeks and counting to “Glory Bound” exhibit at Monmouth University, New Jersey. Show will feature 30 of my photographs of musicians at pivotal moments in their careers. I’ll be sharing some “previews” and stories in days ahead including a few extras. Gotta start with Bruce Springsteen, Harvard Square Theatre, May 9, 1974..”I saw the future of rock and roll and his name is Bruce Springsteen”

GLORY BOUND

Six weeks and counting to “Glory Bound” exhibit at Monmouth University, New Jersey. Show will feature 30 of my photographs of musicians at pivotal moments in their careers. I’ll be sharing some “previews” and stories in days ahead including a few extras. Gotta start with Bruce Springsteen, Harvard Square Theatre, May 9, 1974..”I saw the future of rock and roll and his name is Bruce Springsteen”

THE VIEW FROM THE PIT - STATE RADIO
The first time I shot digital at a rock show ( I’d been out of the loop for a while), I sought out advice. One recommendation was for certain size and speed of storage cards so I could save upwards of 500 shots per card. 500 SHOTS? Were you crazy? Who would need that number? In my day (days of film), I would shoot about three rolls per act, per night, and hope in the 100 or so shots per act I might have three of four that were good. That’s what it was about. You, as the photographer, needed to drive your selection of shots. There were limits and those factors were forced you to make decisions, artistic decisions, that made you to take better shots. That was part of the craft.
In the pit at shows today i see these young guns, with better cameras than mine. They shoot, and shoot and shoot. i step back and watch. I do the math. Three songs, one angle, 500 shots, they’re bound to get something. But i can’t help but notice that, the one over there, doesn’t she recognize that her angle is always going to get the microphone in the face of the singer? And that guy over there, is he ever going to try another point of view? Hmm..maybe if you cast a wide, wide net..you will catch something. Is this the new world of concert photography? Tell me it isn’t. Because I couldn’t do it. I don’t the have the top end camera, I just have my eye. So, I decide to look for something interesting.
The band’s manager writes me back after I posted my work for him. “Thank You”, he says. He then continues, and confides, that he is amazed that when photographers send him work from shows it’s typically 90  frames of the same shot. He thanked me for taking another point of view and informed me he’d like to use my work.
It wasn’t really that I offered another point of view, I offered what I though was a good photograph. That’s why you have the camera with you…right?

THE VIEW FROM THE PIT - STATE RADIO

The first time I shot digital at a rock show ( I’d been out of the loop for a while), I sought out advice. One recommendation was for certain size and speed of storage cards so I could save upwards of 500 shots per card. 500 SHOTS? Were you crazy? Who would need that number? In my day (days of film), I would shoot about three rolls per act, per night, and hope in the 100 or so shots per act I might have three of four that were good. That’s what it was about. You, as the photographer, needed to drive your selection of shots. There were limits and those factors were forced you to make decisions, artistic decisions, that made you to take better shots. That was part of the craft.

In the pit at shows today i see these young guns, with better cameras than mine. They shoot, and shoot and shoot. i step back and watch. I do the math. Three songs, one angle, 500 shots, they’re bound to get something. But i can’t help but notice that, the one over there, doesn’t she recognize that her angle is always going to get the microphone in the face of the singer? And that guy over there, is he ever going to try another point of view? Hmm..maybe if you cast a wide, wide net..you will catch something. Is this the new world of concert photography? Tell me it isn’t. Because I couldn’t do it. I don’t the have the top end camera, I just have my eye. So, I decide to look for something interesting.

The band’s manager writes me back after I posted my work for him. “Thank You”, he says. He then continues, and confides, that he is amazed that when photographers send him work from shows it’s typically 90  frames of the same shot. He thanked me for taking another point of view and informed me he’d like to use my work.

It wasn’t really that I offered another point of view, I offered what I though was a good photograph. That’s why you have the camera with you…right?

New music from State Radio directed by Collie Woods. Proud to have been involved as set photographer.  Here’s some stills

http://www.barryschneierphotography.com/album/stateradio?p=1#1

The Politics of Voice
Musicians and all artists alike have always lent their voice to the political scene. While many of us recall the “protest songs” of the 1960’s, the legacy of musicians speaking out goes far back. In the 1940’s Woody Guthrie, in response to Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America”, composed “This Land is Your Land”. Many believed this to be a song of patriotism. It was actually a call to protest that in a country meant to provide equality to all, many Americans were living in poverty and hunger. As Woody traveled across the country he was struck by this and could not remain silent.
What piece of music isn’t a statement, what work of art isn’t an expression? We all carry in us a voice that wants to be heard. The arts provide this path to articulate these thoughts. Find the story behind any painting, sculpture, photo or writing and you will find a story of a voice looking to for expression.
Bruce Springsteen had said he wouldn’t perform during the 2012 presidential campaign. He has changed his mind. He will lend his voice. He will be heard.
"Bruce Springsteen’s values echo what the President and Vice President (Biden) stand for: hard work, fairness, integrity" said Jim Messina, Obama for America’s campaign manager.
What values, beliefs do you hold that echo with those of others? You’ve heard the voice of others. Now listen to your own.

The Politics of Voice

Musicians and all artists alike have always lent their voice to the political scene. While many of us recall the “protest songs” of the 1960’s, the legacy of musicians speaking out goes far back. In the 1940’s Woody Guthrie, in response to Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America”, composed “This Land is Your Land”. Many believed this to be a song of patriotism. It was actually a call to protest that in a country meant to provide equality to all, many Americans were living in poverty and hunger. As Woody traveled across the country he was struck by this and could not remain silent.

What piece of music isn’t a statement, what work of art isn’t an expression? We all carry in us a voice that wants to be heard. The arts provide this path to articulate these thoughts. Find the story behind any painting, sculpture, photo or writing and you will find a story of a voice looking to for expression.

Bruce Springsteen had said he wouldn’t perform during the 2012 presidential campaign. He has changed his mind. He will lend his voice. He will be heard.

"Bruce Springsteen’s values echo what the President and Vice President (Biden) stand for: hard work, fairness, integrity" said Jim Messina, Obama for America’s campaign manager.

What values, beliefs do you hold that echo with those of others? You’ve heard the voice of others. Now listen to your own.

Patti Smith, The Boarding House, San Francisco 1975
I always thought the road to becoming an artist is a road of discovery. You forge ahead, never really knowing what’s next, but that’s not important. Your passion drives you, reason takes a back seat. I was once told that the path to becoming an artist can be a lonely one.
Patti Smith never set out to be a rock and roll singer. She tried art school, loved making mixed media collages and then decided on poetry. She stayed in New York, slept on friends couches and sometimes even doorsteps. Occasionally the thought of a return to the safety of her family’s home in New Jersey entered her mind but it never took hold. She remained an artist, even at the expense of sometime finding herself alone in the largest metropolis in America.
Her book “Just Kids” is the best testimonial I’ve read on what it is to become an artist. Here’s how Amazon describes it
“It was the summer Coltrane died, the summer of love and riots, and the summer when a chance encounter in Brooklyn led two young people on a path of art, devotion, and initiation.
Patti Smith would evolve as a poet and performer, and Robert Mapplethorpe would direct his highly provocative style toward photography. Bound in innocence and enthusiasm, they traversed the city from Coney Island to Forty-second Street, and eventually to the celebrated round table of Max’s Kansas City, where the Andy Warhol contingent held court. In 1969, the pair set up camp at the Hotel Chelsea and soon entered a community of the famous and infamous—the influential artists of the day and the colorful fringe. It was a time of heightened awareness, when the worlds of poetry, rock and roll, art, and sexual politics were colliding and exploding. In this milieu, two kids made a pact to take care of each other. Scrappy, romantic, committed to create, and fueled by their mutual dreams and drives, they would prod and provide for one another during the hungry years.
Just Kids begins as a love story and ends as an elegy. It serves as a salute to New York City during the late sixties and seventies and to its rich and poor, its hustlers and hellions. A true fable, it is a portrait of two young artists’ ascent, a prelude to fame.”
Patti Smith today is 65. She’s as committed and enthusiastic as ever. Her innocence has grown into wisdom. She has a way with words and still commands an audience. Thankfully, she’s chosen to stay on her road and we are all better people for it. She’s the same artist, seeking, exploring , never tiring. The desire never goes away. There is no end in site, the road is the way. The way is the spirit of the artist in her. Listen to her stories, drink in her words, and you may just hear some of your own life in hers.

Patti Smith, The Boarding House, San Francisco 1975

I always thought the road to becoming an artist is a road of discovery. You forge ahead, never really knowing what’s next, but that’s not important. Your passion drives you, reason takes a back seat. I was once told that the path to becoming an artist can be a lonely one.

Patti Smith never set out to be a rock and roll singer. She tried art school, loved making mixed media collages and then decided on poetry. She stayed in New York, slept on friends couches and sometimes even doorsteps. Occasionally the thought of a return to the safety of her family’s home in New Jersey entered her mind but it never took hold. She remained an artist, even at the expense of sometime finding herself alone in the largest metropolis in America.

Her book “Just Kids” is the best testimonial I’ve read on what it is to become an artist. Here’s how Amazon describes it

“It was the summer Coltrane died, the summer of love and riots, and the summer when a chance encounter in Brooklyn led two young people on a path of art, devotion, and initiation.

Patti Smith would evolve as a poet and performer, and Robert Mapplethorpe would direct his highly provocative style toward photography. Bound in innocence and enthusiasm, they traversed the city from Coney Island to Forty-second Street, and eventually to the celebrated round table of Max’s Kansas City, where the Andy Warhol contingent held court. In 1969, the pair set up camp at the Hotel Chelsea and soon entered a community of the famous and infamous—the influential artists of the day and the colorful fringe. It was a time of heightened awareness, when the worlds of poetry, rock and roll, art, and sexual politics were colliding and exploding. In this milieu, two kids made a pact to take care of each other. Scrappy, romantic, committed to create, and fueled by their mutual dreams and drives, they would prod and provide for one another during the hungry years.

Just Kids begins as a love story and ends as an elegy. It serves as a salute to New York City during the late sixties and seventies and to its rich and poor, its hustlers and hellions. A true fable, it is a portrait of two young artists’ ascent, a prelude to fame.”

Patti Smith today is 65. She’s as committed and enthusiastic as ever. Her innocence has grown into wisdom. She has a way with words and still commands an audience. Thankfully, she’s chosen to stay on her road and we are all better people for it. She’s the same artist, seeking, exploring , never tiring. The desire never goes away. There is no end in site, the road is the way. The way is the spirit of the artist in her. Listen to her stories, drink in her words, and you may just hear some of your own life in hers.

Maybe God likes a good photograph.

Recently I read a post by colleague, and great photographer, Dick Waterman. Besides being responsible for managing and perserving the work of some of the most important blues artists in musical history, Dick’s work  photographing and chronicling the early days of the folks and blues revival in the 1960’s has produced many an iconic image. In Dick’s post he commented on how he was at a folk festival, selling works of his, ( images the like of Bob Dylan and others) at a fair market price, when he passed another display of someone’s Instagram photos selling at $15. How could he compete with that he lamented? Well, you can’t. And maybe that’s just OK. Because the truth is, the advent of making the art of photography as simple as a click on the cell phone is really ushering in a new paradigm. We are all citizen artists.
The advent of social media ushered in the term citizen journalists. We all became empowered to instantly contribute to the information feed. And now it has become part of the mainstream. But where all can contribute,  in time only the best rises to the forefront. But that fact that we all contribute, is what defines the shift. 
And now it applies to the arts. I am a great believer that inside all of us is an artist wanting to emerge. But for so many, the right outlet never presented itself. But perhaps with the exception of photography. While everyone of us might not have ever written a short story, composed a song or painted a landscape, we’ve all taken a photo. And at some point, we sought to take a creative one. Admit it. And now it’s with us everywhere we go, in our cell phone. That’s great. Go ahead, take your photos, embrace your inner artist. Celebrate your desire to be creative. 
It’s OK Dick, the more we create, the more we learn to appreciate the great work of others and the more the great work will rise to the top.  And perhaps from this a movement of appreciating art is emerging as the arts in schools and in public places seem to struggle to survive. Who knew? Maybe, just maybe, God likes a good photograph.

Maybe God likes a good photograph.

Recently I read a post by colleague, and great photographer, Dick Waterman. Besides being responsible for managing and perserving the work of some of the most important blues artists in musical history, Dick’s work  photographing and chronicling the early days of the folks and blues revival in the 1960’s has produced many an iconic image. In Dick’s post he commented on how he was at a folk festival, selling works of his, ( images the like of Bob Dylan and others) at a fair market price, when he passed another display of someone’s Instagram photos selling at $15. How could he compete with that he lamented? Well, you can’t. And maybe that’s just OK. Because the truth is, the advent of making the art of photography as simple as a click on the cell phone is really ushering in a new paradigm. We are all citizen artists.

The advent of social media ushered in the term citizen journalists. We all became empowered to instantly contribute to the information feed. And now it has become part of the mainstream. But where all can contribute,  in time only the best rises to the forefront. But that fact that we all contribute, is what defines the shift. 

And now it applies to the arts. I am a great believer that inside all of us is an artist wanting to emerge. But for so many, the right outlet never presented itself. But perhaps with the exception of photography. While everyone of us might not have ever written a short story, composed a song or painted a landscape, we’ve all taken a photo. And at some point, we sought to take a creative one. Admit it. And now it’s with us everywhere we go, in our cell phone. That’s great. Go ahead, take your photos, embrace your inner artist. Celebrate your desire to be creative. 

It’s OK Dick, the more we create, the more we learn to appreciate the great work of others and the more the great work will rise to the top.  And perhaps from this a movement of appreciating art is emerging as the arts in schools and in public places seem to struggle to survive. Who knew? Maybe, just maybe, God likes a good photograph.

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:
“Patti Smith, The Boarding House, San Francisco 1975”

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

“Patti Smith, The Boarding House, San Francisco 1975”

Bonnie Raitt. Slipstream
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Bonnie Raitt. Slipstream

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BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - MY DEPRESSION
I’ve had my faith shaken
But never hopeless
This is my confession
I need your heart
In this depression
There’s been a lot of words written about Bruce Springsteen. But perhaps the best piece to date is this week’s New Yorker profile by David Remnick. The piece profiles Bruce from his earliest days to the current Wrecking Ball tour. More is revealed in these seventeen pages then any bio to date. We learn about Bruce’s struggles as a teen, his struggles with the loss of Clarence, and yes, with his depression. For some reason the latter is what mainstream media is picking up on. So what? Who hasn’t dealt with depression themselves or known someone who has. I have on both accounts. But the real message in this piece, and in Bruce’s history, is that he is a work in progress, always determined to do his best. His best for his craft, his best for the band and his best for the audience. When he says he feels an obligation every night to deliver to each and every member of his audience a performance that will be invigorating, stimulating, resuscitating and incarnating, he means it. And he wants to make sure you get every dollar’s worth you paid for. Seriously.
When I first encountered Bruce in 1974 I discovered a young man hard at work. At what, I wasn’t sure. But I knew it was mastery in the making. Somewhat diminutive in size he pranced the stage and worked the room like a sorcerer conjuring up a spell. And he did. He laid down a spell on us, a spell that made us feel good. It was a Rock and Roll healing in all it’s glory.
This shot is from a series I did when he came over to the piano and did his solo version of “For You”. Another shot from this series has reached semi-iconic status having appeared in numerous exhibitions, galleries and publications. But a colector from New Jersey saw this shot in my collection and said “that’s the one”. Bruce, his eyes closed, lost in the moment, perhaps for a second feeling the healing himself.
In the New Yorker article Bruce says of the band and his role, “We’re repairmen - repairmen with a toolbox. If I repair a little of myself, I’ll repair a little of you. That’s the job”
That’s the job.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN - MY DEPRESSION

I’ve had my faith shaken

But never hopeless

This is my confession

I need your heart

In this depression

There’s been a lot of words written about Bruce Springsteen. But perhaps the best piece to date is this week’s New Yorker profile by David Remnick. The piece profiles Bruce from his earliest days to the current Wrecking Ball tour. More is revealed in these seventeen pages then any bio to date. We learn about Bruce’s struggles as a teen, his struggles with the loss of Clarence, and yes, with his depression. For some reason the latter is what mainstream media is picking up on. So what? Who hasn’t dealt with depression themselves or known someone who has. I have on both accounts. But the real message in this piece, and in Bruce’s history, is that he is a work in progress, always determined to do his best. His best for his craft, his best for the band and his best for the audience. When he says he feels an obligation every night to deliver to each and every member of his audience a performance that will be invigorating, stimulating, resuscitating and incarnating, he means it. And he wants to make sure you get every dollar’s worth you paid for. Seriously.

When I first encountered Bruce in 1974 I discovered a young man hard at work. At what, I wasn’t sure. But I knew it was mastery in the making. Somewhat diminutive in size he pranced the stage and worked the room like a sorcerer conjuring up a spell. And he did. He laid down a spell on us, a spell that made us feel good. It was a Rock and Roll healing in all it’s glory.

This shot is from a series I did when he came over to the piano and did his solo version of “For You”. Another shot from this series has reached semi-iconic status having appeared in numerous exhibitions, galleries and publications. But a colector from New Jersey saw this shot in my collection and said “that’s the one”. Bruce, his eyes closed, lost in the moment, perhaps for a second feeling the healing himself.

In the New Yorker article Bruce says of the band and his role, “We’re repairmen - repairmen with a toolbox. If I repair a little of myself, I’ll repair a little of you. That’s the job”

That’s the job.

"The Spirit of Independence"
I first met Chad Urmstom over a decade ago. His band “One Fell Swoop” was in the process of changing it’s name to “Dispatch”. A few years later, in 2004, Dispatch would perform their final concert at the Hatch Memorial Shell in Boston. They estimated about 25, 000 people would show up, maybe 30, 000. When the crowd swelled to over 100,000 the city of Boston was forced to shut down the streets surrounding the venue. Three years later they reunited to play a benefit show at Madison Square Garden. to fund raise for a troubled nation, Zimbabwe, It sold out in 24 hours forcing them to add a second show, which sold out as well, not to mention a third show. Not bad for a band who never had a hit single or signed a deal with a major label; which had been their choice.
Chad is a great person and a great musician. Between juggling multiple music projects he makes time to promote his passion for the many causes he supports and cares for. And these aren’t the “hey we’re in a band we better support a cause causes”, they’re the real deal. From raising funds for third world countries in need of support to working to give a voice to challenged individuals, his passion for cause work is genuine and he is fueled by it. I actually got to know him as a peace activist first and a musician later.
But what has impressed me the most is his determination to remain independent. Dispatch grew in popularity on their own terms. Releasing their music on small independent labels, they hit the road playing college campuses and small venues in cities across the country as well as around the globe. Before social media was the launch pad for getting your act known, word of mouth was their means of creating a following. And through word of mouth they soon became what some considered to be the number one independent act of their time. Under the radar of the big music machine, Dispatch ruled. And when the large labels came, they politely said, no thanks.
Remaining true to the spirit of being independent, Chad later formed State Radio,which today continues to gain momentum and grow strong. Popular with his fans, Chad remains true to his self. At a recent music video shoot for State Radio’s upcoming new album, Chad takes the time to introduce himself to the extras on the set. Not that they don’t know who he is, it is his way of saying “I appreciate you being here today and working with me” Chad knows being independent means working a little harder.
In today’s twitter, facebook, look at what I am doing now world, staking your claim as an individual has become the new status quo. So for those who claim to be independent, you’re going to have to find a way to do it on your own. Long live the rebel! Viva La Revolution! Chad, keep it up!

"The Spirit of Independence"

I first met Chad Urmstom over a decade ago. His band “One Fell Swoop” was in the process of changing it’s name to “Dispatch”. A few years later, in 2004, Dispatch would perform their final concert at the Hatch Memorial Shell in Boston. They estimated about 25, 000 people would show up, maybe 30, 000. When the crowd swelled to over 100,000 the city of Boston was forced to shut down the streets surrounding the venue. Three years later they reunited to play a benefit show at Madison Square Garden. to fund raise for a troubled nation, Zimbabwe, It sold out in 24 hours forcing them to add a second show, which sold out as well, not to mention a third show. Not bad for a band who never had a hit single or signed a deal with a major label; which had been their choice.

Chad is a great person and a great musician. Between juggling multiple music projects he makes time to promote his passion for the many causes he supports and cares for. And these aren’t the “hey we’re in a band we better support a cause causes”, they’re the real deal. From raising funds for third world countries in need of support to working to give a voice to challenged individuals, his passion for cause work is genuine and he is fueled by it. I actually got to know him as a peace activist first and a musician later.

But what has impressed me the most is his determination to remain independent. Dispatch grew in popularity on their own terms. Releasing their music on small independent labels, they hit the road playing college campuses and small venues in cities across the country as well as around the globe. Before social media was the launch pad for getting your act known, word of mouth was their means of creating a following. And through word of mouth they soon became what some considered to be the number one independent act of their time. Under the radar of the big music machine, Dispatch ruled. And when the large labels came, they politely said, no thanks.

Remaining true to the spirit of being independent, Chad later formed State Radio,which today continues to gain momentum and grow strong. Popular with his fans, Chad remains true to his self. At a recent music video shoot for State Radio’s upcoming new album, Chad takes the time to introduce himself to the extras on the set. Not that they don’t know who he is, it is his way of saying “I appreciate you being here today and working with me” Chad knows being independent means working a little harder.

In today’s twitter, facebook, look at what I am doing now world, staking your claim as an individual has become the new status quo. So for those who claim to be independent, you’re going to have to find a way to do it on your own. Long live the rebel! Viva La Revolution! Chad, keep it up!

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